Cold Sore Medicine Review – Abreva

You can find Abreva Cold Sore Treatment over-the-counter at most any pharmacy aisle in any store. Abreva is approved by the FDA and says it will reduce the healing time for a cold sore or fever blister. The question is, does it work? We will take a look in a minute.

The Abreva product comes in a relatively tiny 2 gram tube. You can find it retailing for approximately $15 in all stores, or through the Internet.

In reading the directions, it states that you should put the medicine directly on the area where you feel the cold sore coming on. You’re to do this 5 times throughout the day. Abreva says that the key is to begin treatment before the cold sore actually breaks out.

As someone who has cold sores a couple of times during the year, I know how tough they can be to deal with, especially after breaking out. So, I’m always looking for a cold sore medicine that works. With that said, here is my review of Abreva.

1. I found myself having some trouble getting the package open. There is no way to get it open without scissors. Then, when you do get to it, the tube is very tiny, leaving you to wonder if there is anything in it.

2. I found that Abreva took almost a week to take away my pain, not a few days that the product claims. I must say, prescription cold sore medicine is much faster working.

3. Abreva Cold Sore Treatment didn’t eliminate my cold sore quickly. It did work, but not as well as other cold sore medications I’ve used in the past, and nowhere near as fast as a prescription.

4. I was out of Abreva after only 10 days of use. I used it exactly as the directions stated, but the tube didn’t last long. I was a little disappointed to say the least.

I have talked with others who have had good luck with Abreva, but I’m not in that group. I can’t give Abreva a high rating compared to other cold sore medicines available.

Copyright 2006 – Terry Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Reprint Rights: You may reprint this article as long as you leave all of the links active and do not edit the article in any way.

Concierge Medicine Review – Shared Doctor Appointments

Sharing a doctor to increase productivity? Sharing a doctor’s appointment to bond with other patients suffering from the same chronic condition? It is the kind of thing that concierge doctors are concerned over. Imagine paying full price, or your full co-payment, and going to a shared doctor’s appointment with 30 other patients who might be experiencing the same chronic condition that you are. Does this sound like a good idea, or a recipe for disaster?

“Shared medical appointments improve patient access, enhance patient and physician satisfaction, and increase practice productivity, all without adding more hours to a physician’s work week. There is even evidence that they promote better outcomes and lower overall costs of care.” That’s according to ManagedCareMag.com.

Lets add some insight into the previous image; imagine paying full price for a doctor’s visit, visiting with that doctor in a room full of other patients, or ‘observers,’ who are able to ‘sit-in’ on your doctor’s appointment, share ideas, discuss symptoms, and listen to every word that you are telling your doctor. Not much room for privacy, huh?

And when it comes to privacy, there are two different thoughts on the matter. One patient told NBC that his experience with the shared doctor’s appointment was not all it was cracked up to be; “One on one I can talk to the doctor and ask personal things, not that I can’t do that here but I don’t want to take up the time.”

And yet a physician told another media out let the exact opposite; “The biggest surprise was patient confidentiality,” says Rajan Bhandari, MD, chief of neurology at the Kaiser Permanente Santa Theresa Medical Center in San Jose. “They reveal more about themselves than I would ever have known about them otherwise. They seem to really blossom when they’re in a warm, empathic environment where they feel nurtured, supported, and not alone.”

While the money spent is exactly the same, the confidentiality seems to be lacking, and the overall medical treatment might be deficient, physicians say the “real benefit is that instead of pretending that patients who have been living with chronic medical conditions don’t know anything about them, you actually involve them in the care-giving process.”

According to ManagedCareMag.com, a two-year study funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation showed that patients participating in the cooperative-clinic model stayed independent longer and were more satisfied with their physicians and with their understanding of their medical conditions. Physician satisfaction also increased, while hospitalization and ER use decreased by 12 and 18 percent, respectively. Cooperative-clinic participants were 2.5 times as likely to stay with their physician and with Kaiser.

This method of medicine becomes not so much about the chronic condition itself, but about the person living with the chronic condition. This bonding between patients with like conditions and the ability to help one-another out in these shared doctor appointments seems to offer an “installation of hope.” In shared doctor appointments, patients no longer feel like they’re the only ones dealing with the chronic condition. They can see others living with the condition as well, whether in a greater way or a less fortunate way.

Another aspect of shared doctor appointments is the time spent with the doctor, though it might be ‘shared’ time. A general appointment with the family physician will run from between 8 to 10 minutes, while in a shared appointment that time is extended to 90 minutes, a benefit that makes patients feel as if their getting their money’s worth.

While it might be a little different, and may take some getting used to, it is creating a buzz in the medical community and it is getting people excited about more possibilities for healthcare. Shared doctor appointments are bringing more attention to the fact that patients are frustrated with the system, with the way they are treated in their 8 minute doctor appointments, and that they are looking for alternatives to general medicine.

Review-medicine Show

Medicine Show, Heidi Lampietti (ed.), 2017, ISBN 1892619091

This is a collaborative novel (each chapter written by a different person) about a medicine show traveling around Europe in the immediate aftermath of World War I.

Professor Bernhard Freedomhowler’s Internationally Acclaimed Traveling Exhibition of Medicinal Wonderment consists of a very disparate group of individuals. Calliope is a boy with smooth skin, a snout-like nose and a tail, who can whistle from his mouth, his nose and even his ears. Norris is part-human and part-dog, who is brought on stage as a snarling, ravenous beast ready to tear out someone’s throat. After he is given a dose of Freedomhowler’s Pan-Herbal Restorative Elixir, he immediately turns into a calm, erudite person quoting Shakespeare.

Lady Bodicaea (real name: Heather McInnerney) is Scottish, and the show’s strongwoman. Grenadine is an English nurse who is the show’s medium/fortune teller. The leader of the group is Bernhard Freedomhowler (his real name is Tarbottom), an American from Kentucky. He learned the business as part of Wild Bill Hickok’s Perambulatory of Astonishing Wonders. Wild Bill has become a figment of Freedomhowler’s imagination, and constantly talks to him.

The group spends much of its time just trying to make enough money to eat and to make it to the next town or village. There is the always-present need to make a quick exit should the local townspeople decide that the group has worn out its welcome. Freedomhowler also tries to stay away from Drake, part of the American forces, who orders him to give up the medicine show and return to America (Freedomhowler is an ex-spy).

With any collaborative novel like this, some chapters will be better than others. It’s a good story, and for those interested in the history of World War I, this book is worth checking out.